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‘EU citizens only’: Why Brits are at the back for the queue for ski season jobs in France

Working the ski season in France has long been popular with young Brits, but in the first full post-Brexit season, many job adverts are specifying that only candidates who have EU passports or residency will be considered.

'EU citizens only': Why Brits are at the back for the queue for ski season jobs in France
Seasonal work in French resorts like Meribel is harder to get for Britons after Brexit (Photo: Philippe Desmazes | AFP

Employers in the French ski industry have begun advertising for people work the 2021/22 season, but from ski instructors to chalet hosts dozens of adverts state that they will not consider applications from British people, unless they already have an EU passport or residency rights.

Since the end of the Brexit transition period, Brits wishing to work in France may need both visas and work permits – and it seems that employers looking for temporary seasonal staff have decided that this is simply not worth the hassle.

READ ALSO What are the rules on short-term and seasonal work in France?

One job ad said: “Procedures for employing UK passport holders post-Brexit are still in the process of being finalised, and therefore we unfortunately cannot accept any applications from UK passport holders until this is resolved.”

Image: www.seasonworkers.com screengrab

Trade body Seasonal Businesses in Travel (SBiT) has warned that up to 25,000 British seasonal worker jobs in the travel industry will be lost as a result, many of them contracted by UK-based companies.

Image: www.seasonworkers.com screengrab

It is easier for many businesses in France simply to find workers who have the right to work in the EU in the first place, rather than having first having to prove that no French worker wants to do the job by advertising the position at Pôle Emploi for eight weeks; then finding a UK worker, and arranging a work permit and visa – all for a few months of work. 

If you are coming to France to work you may need both a visa and a work permit depending on the type and duration of your work – full details HERE.

These rules refer to all short-term and seasonal work, including people who want to come and work during the grape-picking season or work over the summer in holiday or tourism related jobs.

Member comments

  1. Argy bargy about ski moniteurs/monitrice from the UK , USA , NZ etc has been going on for years. It was originally union motivated or at least by a wish to reserve the jobs for the Fr. (and Swiss) nationals trained in Fr. Because many visitors to Fr. ski resorts were anglophones the resistance did not survive the entry of the UK to the EU. Thomas Carr

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TRAVEL NEWS

Amber alert: Travellers to France warned of another busy weekend at UK ports

A week after chaotic scenes and 6-hour queues at the port of Dover, the British motoring organisation the AA has issued an amber traffic warning, and says it expects cross-Channel ports to be very busy once again this weekend as holidaymakers head to France.

Amber alert: Travellers to France warned of another busy weekend at UK ports

The AA issued the amber warning on Thursday for the whole of the UK, the first time that it has issued this type of warning in advance.

Roads across the UK are predicted to be extremely busy due to a combination of holiday getaways, several large sporting events and a rail strike – but the organisation said that it expected traffic to once again be very heavy around the port of Dover and the Channel Tunnel terminal at Folkestone.

Last weekend there was gridlock in southern England and passengers heading to France enduring waits of more than six hours at Dover, and four hours at Folkestone.

The AA said that while it doesn’t expect quite this level of chaos to be repeated, congestion was still expected around Dover and Folkestone.

On Thursday ferry operator DFDS was advising passengers to allow two hours to get through check-in and border controls, while at Folkestone, the Channel Tunnel operators only said there was a “slightly longer than usual” wait for border controls.

In both cases, passengers who miss their booked train or ferry while in the queue will be accommodated on the next available crossing with no extra charge.

Last weekend was the big holiday ‘getaway’ weekend as schools broke up, and a technical fault meant that some of the French border control team were an hour late to work, adding to the chaos. 

But the underlying problems remain – including extra checks needed in the aftermath of Brexit, limited space for French passport control officers at Dover and long lorry queues on the motorway heading to Folkestone.

OPINION UK-France travel crisis will only be solved when the British get real about Brexit

The port of Dover expects 140,000 passengers, 45,000 cars and 18,000 freight vehicles between Thursday and Sunday, and queues were already starting to build on Thursday morning.

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