SHARE
COPY LINK
Paywall free

JOHN LICHFIELD

PODCAST: Who is to blame for the turmoil in France and when will calm return? (Bonus episode)

French politics expert John Lichfield joins us for a bonus episode of Talking France to give his views on who's to blame for the current turmoil in France, if the protests really are a new "May 1968" and how and when calm might return to the streets?

Talking France
Talking France. A podcast by The Local. Image: The Local

With France mired in political crisis, strikes against pension reform continuing and protests turning violent The Local brings you a special bonus episode of Talking France featuring more valuable analysis from French politics John Lichfield.

If this is your first time listening to Talking France you should check out our regular weekly podcast which looks at a wide range of news, talking points and cultural questions from France. You can listen to all our recent episodes HERE.
 
But for this bonus episode we are sticking to one subject focussing on the political crisis and protests against pension reform that have gripped the country in recent weeks.

 
Why has France become so angry, why have protests turned violent, are protesters right to talk about a repeat of May 1968 or does France over-romanticise protests and political violence – including the French Revolution itself?
 
These are just some of the questions I put to John, our veteran French politics expert, for this bonus episode.
 
You can listen on Apple, Spotify or Google podcasts by downloading the podcast HERE. Or simply press play below.
 

 
 
Remember you can find all episodes of Talking France HERE – and if you like what you hear please leave us a review or just tell a friend.
 
 

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

POLITICS

British PM promises ‘new impetus’ to French ties

Britain's Prime Minister Keir Starmer promised on Thursday to bring a "new impetus" to ties with France and to work with Paris to oppose Russia's invasion of Ukraine and end migrant-trafficking across the Channel.

British PM promises 'new impetus' to French ties

Starmer was to meet France’s President Emmanuel Macron later in the day for one-to-one talks on the sidelines of the European Political Community summit in Blenheim Palace, near Oxford.

In a piece published in French newspaper Le Monde to mark the meeting, the new British premier acknowledged Britain is no longer one of France’s EU partners, since the previous government left the union.

But, Starmer wrote, 120 years after the Entente Cordiale agreements resolving colonial disputes between Paris and London, “we are still bound by many things”, citing the G7 group, UN Security Council and NATO.

And he recalled the key role Britain and France have played as European military and economic powers in resisting Russia.

“I never thought, in my lifetime, that I would hear the rumble of war echoing across Europe. I never thought a leader would choose such an absurd and destructive path,” Starmer wrote.

“And yet, Russian President Vladimir Putin made this choice. Our determination to face it must never waver.”

Freshly elected at the head of a Labour Party government with a large House of Commons majority, Starmer also addressed the issue of cross-Channel migration, which has hurt ties in the recent past.

As prime minister, Starmer has already abandoned his predecessor’s efforts to expel asylum-seekers arriving in Britain by boat to Rwanda, but is still seeking a way to slow arrivals from France.

“A veritable criminal empire is today at work throughout Europe. It profits from human misery and despair, sending countless innocent people to their deaths in the waters of the English Channel,” he said.

“For me, this problem is no longer a challenge, it is a crisis. We will therefore work with France and with all our European partners to resolve it,” he wrote, vowing that Britain would respect international law.

The former senior lawyer stressed that Britain would continue to respect the European Convention on Human Rights, which the previous government had considered quitting.

SHOW COMMENTS