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Danish cafe fined 40,000 kroner for refusing cash

A café in Copenhagen must pay a hefty fine after refusing to accept cash payments from customers.

Danish cafe fined 40,000 kroner for refusing cash
A Danish cafe broke trade rules by refusing to accept cash. Photo by Emre on Unsplash

The café, Original Coffee, refused for four months to accept cash, broadcaster DR writes.

Copenhagen City Court rules on Friday that it thereby was in breach of rules protecting the use of cash under Danish law.

The state ombudsman for consumers filed a report against the café with police. It was found to have broken the law and must therefore pay a 40,000-krone penalty.

Under Danish law, businesses must accept cash between 6am and 10pm unless the transaction is remote – for example online – or at an unstaffed outlet such as a self-service petrol station.

The café said it had chosen not to accept cash because of the Covid-19 pandemic as well as a lack of change and the risk of break-ins. It reintroduced cash payments on February 1st this year.

It is unclear whether the business will appeal against the decision.

READ ALSO: Denmark will eventually be cash-free: expert

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PROPERTY

Number of homes for sale in Denmark up 30 percent in 2022

After a period with low numbers of homes for sale, 2022 offered a lot more to choose from for buyers in Denmark.

Number of homes for sale in Denmark up 30 percent in 2022

New data from banking organisation Finans Danmark show that the number of houses for sale across the country is around 31 percent higher than it was a year ago.

This represents the largest influx of homes onto the market for 16 years, economist Brian Friis Helmer of Arbejdernes Landsbank told news wire Ritzau via written comment.

“The many extra ‘for sale’ signs come as a result of interest in buying houses drying out notably during the course of the year, as the housing market began to experience a headwind,” he said.

Higher interest rates in particular have dealt a blow to the market, he said.

Around 36,000 detached houses, terraced houses and apartments were for sale at the end of 2022, according to Finans Danmark.

The number of homes on the market is now at its highest for two years, Helmer said.

“But that comes from a point where it was at its lowest since 2006,” he also noted.

The price of a new home or flat has meanwhile fallen for the fourth consecutive month.

Copenhagen and its surroundings in particular have seen a sharp jump — the number of owner-occupied flats on the market has leapt nearly 70 percent in the last year.

But it’s not all roses for the would-be home buyer in Denmark. Higher interest rates make it more expensive to finance home loans, Helmer noted. 

“There are handles at both ends of the rope and the overall package for home buyers is therefore not better measured over all parameters,” he wrote.

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