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FOOD & DRINK

Hugo, Almdudler and Radler: 5 drinks to try in Austria this summer

It is easier to face the summer heat with a proper cold drink in your hands. Austrians know that well and have created (or made popular) several delicious alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Here are five you should try.

summer drink wine
What is the perfect summer drink in Austria? (Photo by cottonbro/Pexels)

The debate of which is the perfect summer drink is undoubtedly a very controversial one.

While many people would argue that nothing can beat the Italian Aperol Spritz (which is also very popular in Austria), some would rather stay with a simple cold beer.

If you are team Spritz, then you should know that Austria has a love for things g’spritzt, with their own versions of sparkling drinks (with or without alcohol). However, for those who prefer a beer, the alpine country is home to several famous brands, including the Styrian Gösser, the Viennese Ottakringer, and Stiegl, from Salzburg.

READ ALSO: Five Austrian destinations you can reach by train to escape the heat

In any case, when living or visiting a new country, it’s always fun to try out the traditional dishes and, in this case, beverages.

Here are five drinks you should try during the Austrian summer.

Hugo drink summer drink austria

Hugo is a very popular (and sweet) summer drink in Austria (Photo by Greta Farnedi on Unsplash)

Hugo

Some say this is the Austrian answer to the Aperol Spritz, but its sweetness from the elderflower syrup makes it quite different from the bitter bright orange Aperol.

There is also a bit of controversy as to where this drink, which Austrians love to drink during a nice summer afternoon, originates.

Internationally, it seems to be widely accepted that this alcoholic aperitif comes from South Tyrol, a German-speaking region of Italy with deep Austrian roots. Ask any Austrian, though, and they will tell that just proves the drink is from Austria.

READ ALSO: Eight ways to talk about the heat like a true Austrian

Italian or Austrian, the sweet drink is made with prosecco, elderflower syrup, seltzer and mint leaves. Serve it with lots of ice in a large glass, and you have a perfect summer drink.

white wine drinks party

Mix your white wine with sparkling water and you get a refreshing gespritzt (Photo by Matthieu Joannon on Unsplash)

weiß gespritzt

This is extremely popular, relatively cheap even in fancy restaurants, and somewhat controversial, but take some white wine and add a little sparkling water (sometimes ice) and you get a weiß gespritzt, or a g’spritzter.

READ ALSO: The best Austrian wineries to visit this summer

Not everyone appreciates mixing your wine with water, but it makes for a refreshing and lighter drink. In Austrian restaurants, you might be asked whether you want a summer gespritzt, which means it has higher water content and, therefore, is lighter, or a “normal” one.

It is by no means an Austrian drink, and you may have to ask for a Weinschorle instead of a Gespritzter in Germany, but it is a popular drink in the German world.

gösser radler drink

Austrian brands sell some of the most popular Radlers in Europe (Photo by Jonathan Kemper on Unsplash)

Radler

A Radler is another drink that though not from Austria, is extremely popular here. Not only that but some of the most popular Radlers are sold by Austrian brands.

Traditionally, all you need to make a Radler is to mix beer and lemonade. However, the drink is also found bottled and sold by beer companies such as Gösser and Ottakringer. The mix has also expanded and you can discover Radlers with a citrus or berry mix.

READ ALSO: Austrian old folks toast success of ‘Grandma and Grandpa’ beer

It is a lighter and sweeter beer, perfect for enjoying the summer with a fresh drink that is not so alcoholic.

Mixing apple juice and sparkling water creates a perfect non-alcoholic summer drink. (Photo by MIGUEL RIOPA / AFP)

Apfelspritz

Following the Austrian love for adding sparkling water to drinks, a very common and non-alcoholic beverage is the Apfelspritz.

It is a mix of apple juice and (you guessed it) sparkling water. It is popular in Biergarten as a non-alcoholic alternative, with kids joining in on toasts with their apple and soda mix.

The drink is also very common in Germany (where it is known as Apfelschorle), Switzerland and Hungary.

READ ALSO: Cash and Schnapps: A guide to visiting pubs and cafes in Austria

almdualer gerhard schilling

Almdudler’s CEO Gerhard Schilling holds a bottle of the traditional Austrian drink (© Philipp Lipiarski)

Almdudler

Another option for a summer light and non-alcoholic drink is the Almdudler, which is technically the name of the Austrian brand that sells the famous carbonated soft drink.

The drink is a blend of 32 “natural alpine herbs, beet sugar and soda water”, according to the website. It has a very distinctive logo and can be found in almost all Austrian households – being one of the most popular beverages in the country.

Did we forget about your favourite summer drink? Then let us know in the comments below or send us an email at [email protected]

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VIENNA

Wiener Weinwandertag: Everything you need to know about Vienna’s ‘Wine Hiking Day’

After a two-year pandemic break, one of Vienna's beloved autumn traditions is back. Here's all the info you need to take part in it.

Wiener Weinwandertag: Everything you need to know about Vienna's 'Wine Hiking Day'

During an early autumn weekend, thousands of Viennese and people from other parts of Austria participate in the city’s Wine Hiking tradition, which is exactly what it sounds like: walking around vineyards and trying out different wines and food.

It’s a great way to celebrate the arrival of autumn (and fresh wine season) in a very Austrian way: outdoors, with friends and family, and with traditional drinks and food. “Visit wineries and wine taverns with snack stations, taste delicious Viennese wine and enjoy the view of Vienna from viewing points”, the City of Vienna advertises.

READ ALSO: Explore Austria: Mauer, a charming wine-hiking spot on Vienna’s outskirts

There are four different paths that people can take, with different lengths. The shortest is the Ottakring hike, in Vienna’s 16th district, with 2.4 kilometres.

There is also the Mauer trek in the 23rd district, with 4.6 kilometres. The Strebersdorf to Stammersdorf, in the 21st district, offers two different routes, one with an 8.8-kilometre length and the other with a 9.6-kilometre trek.

Finally, the longest trek is in the 19th district, the Neustift am Walde to Nussdorf, with a 10.8-kilometre length. Of course, you don’t need to take the entire route and there are several stops with food, wine, entertainment and even children’s playgrounds on the hikes.

There are also many spots to sit and enjoy the view (and wine). (Copyright: PID / Christian Fürthner)

How do I get to the hiking points?

  • Weinspaziergang Mauer (23rd district): You can get there with the 56A bus (stop Ursulinenkloster) or the Bus 60A (stop Rodauner Strasse).
  • Weinspaziergang Ottakring (16th district): You can get there using bus 56A (Ursuinenkloster stop) or bus 60A (Rodauner Strasse stop). This is a round trek.
  • Weinspaziergang Neustift bis Nussdorf: You can get there through several entering points and follow different routes. The main points are Neustift am Walde (Autobus 35A), Sievering (Autobus 39A), Weingut Wien Cobenzl (Autobus 38A), Grinzing (Straßenbahn 38), Nußdorf (Straßenbahn D).
  • Weinspaziergang Strebersdorf bis Stammersdorf: There are also several points of entrance and different shortcuts to make the trekking shorter, but the main entry points are: Strebersdorf (Straßenbahn 26) and Stammersdorf (Straßenbahn 31).

The hike is family-friendly and can also get quite full (Copyright MA 49 / Fürthner)
 

The hikes in detail

The hikes are varied in length and offers. They bring different resting points and different stalls where local wineries can show their products. The official brochure has all the maps and signs, but the paths themselves are also very well maintained and signalled. The hundreds of people walking them also serve as a good guiding point.

Alternatively, you can also hike along smaller sections. Here you can find maps and more information on each paths:
 
Ottakring

(Stadt Wien)
Resting spots:
A: Weinbau Stippert
B: Weinbau Leitner

Neustift bis Nußdorf

Stadt Wien
 
Resting spots:
A: Weinbau Wolf
B: Weingut Kroiss
C: Buschenschank Haslinger
D: Weinbau Burner
E: Weingut Wien Cobenzl / Wiener Gusto
F: Genuss am Cobenzl
G: Buschenschank Hengl-Haselbrunner
H: Weinbau Wiegel
I: Weinbau & Buschenschank Taschler
J: Wagner & Glass
K: Weinbau Langes
L: Mayer am Nußberg
M: Buschenschank Feuerwehr Wagner am Nußberg
N: Weingut Wailand
O: Weingut Stift Klosterneuburg
P: Pedalones
Q: Buschenschank Wanderer am Fuße des Nußbergs
R: Buschenschank Wieninger am Nußberg
S: Buschenschank Franzinger
T: Buschenschank Windischbauer
U: Die Buschenschenkerei Ing. Michael Ruthner
 
Strebersdorf bis Stammersdorf

Stadt Wien
 
Resting spots:
A: Weingut Schilling und Tony Allen – Naturalcrafts
B: Weingut Walter Wien
C: WBV Strebersdorf
D: LAWIES – Buschenschank über den langen Wiesthalen
E: Villa Weinrot
F: Bio-Weingut Weinhandwerk
G: WBV Stammersdorf Vinothek
H: Weingut Dr. Höfler – Ausblick.Wien
I: Weingut Sackl
J: Buschenschank in den Gabrissen
K: Keller am Berg K. Lentner
L: Heuriger Gerhard & Hermine Klager
 
Mauer

Stadt Wien
 
Resting spots:
A: Weinbau M&M Beranek
B: Weingut Edelmoser
C: Bio Weingut Fuchs-Steinklammer
D: Buschenschank Grausenburger

READ ALSO: How to drink wine like an Austrian

The trails are senior and child friendly; there are separate, specially marked trails for families who like to travel with prams.

Dogs (on a leash) are welcome.

The stalls are open from 10 am to 6 pm on Saturday and Sunday.

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