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TAXES

The upcoming deadlines you need to know for tax declarations in France

It's tax declaration season in France and some of the key dates have changed. Here's a reminder of the ones you need to know.

The upcoming deadlines you need to know for tax declarations in France
The word "Impots" (Taxes) on top of euro banknotes in Lille on August 25, 2014. (Photo by PHILIPPE HUGUEN / AFP)

It is tax season in France, and pretty soon we will be approaching the deadline to file for your 2021 revenues. 

Filing by the post

For those who use the paper form and file their tax declarations via the post, the deadline, which was initially scheduled for May 19th, has been pushed back to May 31st, 2022 (at latest by 11:59pm).

This is due to the fact that some taxpayers received their 2021 tax return (pre-filled in paper format) significantly later than in previous years, an issue that concerns “a little less than 5 percent of users receiving these returns,” according to a press release by the French finance ministry. 

This should not change the dates for everyone though, as most taxpayers will file online.

READ MORE: The complete French tax calendar for 2022 – which taxes are due when?

Filing online

The deadlines for filing online déclarations have not changed. The date to declare your revenues remains based on the département you reside in. If you are a non-resident, the date is May 24th.

Tuesday, May 24th 2022 by 11:59pm: “Zone 1” (départements 1 through 19) 

Tuesday, May 31st 2022 by 11:59pm: “Zone 2” (départements 20 through 54). As mentioned previously, this is also the deadline for those filing by the post. 

Wednesday, June 8th by 11:59pm: “Zone 3” (départements 55 to 974/976)

Who has to fill one out?

Most people living in France – residents, second home owners, those working in France or employers of those working in France – need to fill out a déclaration de revenues. If you are wondering about whether you are exempted from declaring your revenues in France, here is a guide

READ MORE: EXPLAINED: Who has to make a tax declaration in France in 2022?

For filling out your tax declaration, you will first and foremost need to have a numéro fiscale (tax number). The French government has recently created a guide to help foreigners with filling out their first French tax declaration, though you can always go straight to the official government tax website.

Nevertheless, if you are still struggling, you can always email the Tax4Business help desk service ([email protected]) which is run by the French government’s Public Finances Directorate (DGFiP). It is the primary point of contact for all tax related questions involving foreign nationals.

READ MORE: Ask the expert: How to fill out the 2022 French tax declaration

What should you include in your declaration?

You will need to include your salary income (which includes professional expenses, bonuses, etc), any additional income you earned on top of your salary, your pension income and/or social security payments, any income related to investment or real estate, and finally any unemployment benefits you received in the last year. If you’re worried about any bank accounts you have outside of France, here is what you need to know.

READ MORE: Reader question: Do I need to declare my non-French bank accounts?

You’ll also need to declare any changes of status – Did you get married or have a child? Did you change or lose your job? These are the types of changes you will need to note on the declaration form.

Member comments

  1. My French tax declaration was five pages. My US declaration was 110 pages. Be happy if you’re not a citizen of the US!

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ENERGY

French electricity firms offer bonuses for cutting back this winter

Two leading French electricity providers will offer bonuses this winter to households that reduce consumption in the face of soaring prices and potential supply disruptions.

French electricity firms offer bonuses for cutting back this winter

Russia has slashed gas exports to Europe in response to Western sanctions over its war against Ukraine, while many of France’s nuclear reactors — providing around 70 percent of its electricity — are offline for safety checks or repairs.

TotalEnergies said Wednesday that bonuses of €30 to €120 would be paid to private clients who adopt the government’s calls for energy “sobriety” over winter months.

Usage is measured by smart meters that show real-time consumption, which have been installed for over three million clients, the company said.

Rival energy group Engie also announced a bonus programme starting mid-October for households that cut back on days when the grid is under particular strain.

For clients who reduce use by 10 to 20 percent those days, Engie will offer rebates of five to ten euros, said marketing director Marion Deridder-Blondel.

State-owned EDF — by far the largest electricity supplier to French households — is facing a €29-billion hit to profit from the nuclear reactor outages that will require it to buy electricity from other producers.

It has not announced a new plan to encourage energy savings, but already offers rebates to clients who cut back on so-called “red” days of peak usage in winter.

Worries about rising prices for a slew of everyday goods have moved the forefront across Europe as supply disruptions from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine persist, raising the risk of economic slowdowns or even recessions.

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