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EUROPEAN UNION

Pensions in the EU: What you need to know if you’re moving country

Have you ever wondered what to do with your private pension plan when moving to another European country?

Pensions in the EU: What you need to know if you're moving country
Flags of the EU member states flutter in the air near a statue of the Euro logo outside the European Commission building in Brussels, on May 28, 2020. (Photo by Kenzo TRIBOUILLARD / AFP)

This question will probably have caused some headaches. Fortunately a new private pension product meant to make things easier should soon become available under a new EU regulation that came into effect this week. 

The new pan-European personal pension product (PEPP) will allow savers to take their private pension with them if they move within the European Union.

EU rules so far allowed the aggregation of state pensions and the possibility to carry across borders occupational pensions, which are paid by employers. But the market of private pensions remained fragmented.

The new product is expected to benefit especially young people, who tend to move more frequently across borders, and the self-employed, who might not be covered by other pension schemes. 

According to a survey conducted in 16 countries by Insurance Europe, the organisation representing insurers in Brussels, 38 percent of Europeans do not save for retirement, with a proportion as high as 60 percent in Finland, 57 percent in Spain, 56 percent in France and 55 percent in Italy. 

The groups least likely to have a pension plan are women (42% versus 34% of men), unemployed people (67%), self-employed and part-time workers in the private sector (38%), divorced and singles (44% and 43% respectively), and 18-35 year olds (40%).

“As a complement to public pensions, PEPP caters for the needs of today’s younger generation and allows people to better plan and make provisions for the future,” EU Commissioner for Financial Services Mairead McGuinness said on March 22nd, when new EU rules came into effect. 

The scheme will also allow savers to sign up to a personal pension plan offered by a provider based in another EU country.

Who can sign up?

Under the EU regulation, anyone can sign up to a pan-European personal pension, regardless of their nationality or employment status. 

The scheme is open to people who are employed part-time or full-time, self-employed, in any form of “modern employment”, unemployed or in education. 

The condition is that they are resident in a country of the European Union, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein (the European Economic Area). The PEPP will not be available outside these countries, for instance in Switzerland. 

How does it work?

PEPP providers can offer a maximum of six investment options, including a basic one that is low-risk and safeguards the amount invested. The basic PEPP is the default option. Its fees are capped at 1 percent of the accumulated capital per year.

People who move to another EU country can continue to contribute to the same PEPP. Whenever a consumer changes the country of residence, the provider will open a new sub-account for that country. If the provider cannot offer such option, savers have the right to switch provider free of charge.  

As pension products are taxed differently in each state, the applicable taxation will be that of the country of residence and possible tax incentives will only apply to the relevant sub-account. 

Savers who move residence outside the EU cannot continue saving on their PEPP, but they can resume contributions if they return. They would also need to ask advice about the consequences of the move on the way their savings are taxed. 

Pensions can then be paid out in a different location from where the product was purchased. 

Where to start?

Pan-European personal pension products can be offered by authorised banks, insurance companies, pension funds and wealth management firms. 

They are regulated products that can be sold to consumers only after being approved by supervisory authorities. 

As the legislation came into effect this week, only now eligible providers can submit the application for the authorisation of their products. National authorities have then three months to make a decision. So it will still take some time before PEPPs become available on the market. 

When this will happen, the products and their features will be listed in the public register of the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA). 

For more information:

https://www.eiopa.europa.eu/browse/regulation-and-policy/pan-european-personal-pension-product-pepp/consumer-oriented-faqs-pan_en 

https://www.eiopa.europa.eu/browse/regulation-and-policy/pan-european-personal-pension-product-pepp_en 

This article is published in cooperation with Europe Street News, a news outlet about citizens’ rights in the EU and the UK. 

Member comments

  1. The cap of 1% fees is welcome but frankly way too high. If you compare to the fees charged by Vanguard or Fidelity in the US you can see how even 1% over the savings lifetime of 30-40 years is a real gouge. This is plain vanilla arithmetic. I have a managed individual retirement account at Vanguard in the US that charges me .16%. And note that is a managed fund. The purer index funds, which simply track the whole market whether bonds or shares, are even less costly.

  2. I have been paid a complementary pension by Agirc-Arrco ( after much difficulty trying to claim it during the pandemic). I received it ( I thought ) under the terms of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement ( financial section) which states that a person should not be worse off re their financial situation ( french complementary pension) after Brexit. Although I lived and worked in France for
    Ten years and accumulated many points in the scheme…for which I have been paid monthly…now they have blocked my
    account due to completely ambiguous wording of the INFO RETRAITE formulaire which I used for instructions in sending my certificat de Vie. I am 68 years old and worked hard years to accumulate this pension….who to speak to ? I am hoping that the French state part of my pension will be paid as usual as that account isn’t blocked. Any help appreciated.
    .

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MONEY

What to know about investing in cryptocurrency in Germany

Germany has been dubbed the most crypto-friendly country in the world. We break down why that is, and what you should know about cryptocurrency in Germany.

What to know about investing in cryptocurrency in Germany

As with all of our financial and tax summaries, this is a guide on regulations only. For financial advice which is personalised to your situation, please contact an accountant or other specialist. Please note also that EU financial regulators have warned that many crypto-assets are highly risky and speculative. Find out more information here.

At first glance, Germany seems an odd place to be a cryptocurrency haven. Only 17 percent of people in Germany invest – way behind the percentages seen in other countries – which may go some way towards justifying the country’s reputation as a land of risk-averse savers.

Cryptocurrency, often called crypto for short, is considered by many investment analysts to be one of the riskiest and most volatile investments a person can own.

Concerns have also been raised over the environmental impact of cryptocurrencies.

There are countless types of crypto on the market these days. What each one has in common is that it is digital and secured using cryptography, meaning they can’t be counterfeited. 

Even the three biggest and most well-known cryptocurrencies – Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Ripple – are prone to huge sudden spikes and falls in value. It’s also a market that has seen some, like the LUNA cryptocurrency last month, crash completely.

Yet, bucking national stereotypes, Germany has some of the most favourable laws in the world for investing in these high-risk assets.

READ ALSO: What you should know about investing in Germany

Germany’s crypto tax advantages

Crypto exchange comparison site Coincub recently named Germany as the world’s most crypto-friendly country, with Singapore and the United States rounding out the top three.

A big reason for this comes down to favourable tax laws. Normally, when someone in Germany sells a regular stock or ETF asset at a higher price than they bought it for, their brokerage will automatically withhold 25 percent of their gain in tax.

Euro notes bitcoin coins

Euro notes and bitcoin coins on a laptop. Photo: picture alliance/dpa/dpa-tmn | Christin Klose

But following tax guidance issued by the Federal Ministry of Finance last month, certain gains in cryptocurrency could face absolutely no taxation at all.

Firstly, the ministry has affirmed that any profit of less than €600 faces no tax. More significantly though, cryptocurrency that someone in Germany has held for at least a year faces no tax at all – no matter how big the gain is when that person sells it.

Why is the law so favourable in Germany?

One variable is political. The liberal Free Democrats tend to attract a sizeable number of votes from the very demographics more likely to hold crypto. While the FDP is in a three-way coalition with the progressive Social Democrats (SPD) and the Greens, FDP leader Christian Lindner currently holds the German Finance Ministry.

During the 2021 election campaign, Lindner made regulating and attracting crypto investment a big part of the FDP platform and coalition negotiations.

“I think the German government understands how to make money better than a lot of other countries,” says the man behind crypto Youtuber The Modern Investor, a channel with over 225,000 subscribers.

“A lot of people in the crypto space are very internationally mobile,” he tells The Local. “If they choose to live in Germany for the favourable investing conditions, they’re going to be spending money in German supermarkets and buying German services. The money the government misses out on in taxes tends to go right back in the system.”

“If cryptocurrencies continue to take off globally, Germany will eventually be seen as a genius for figuring out how to attract this money and keep it within its borders,” he adds.

Germany’s crypto niche to go mainstream?

Cryptocurrency is still a niche investment in Germany. While only 17 percent of Germans own stocks, only about 2.6 percent own cryptocurrency.

German crypto investors typically skew younger, with a third of all German crypto investors being 34-years-old or younger. The more a person makes, the more likely they are to hold crypto as well, with two-thirds of all German crypto investors earning €800,000 a year or more.

That narrow niche is still big within the crypto community itself though. Around nine percent of the world’s Bitcoin nodes – the computers that run the secure list of transactions using that currency on a digital ledger known as the blockchain – are in Germany, and 14 percent of Ethereum nodes, another major cryptocurrency. That’s second only to the US.

Cryptocurrencies

A tablet screen displays the value of various cryptocurrencies in the Coinbase app. Photo: picture alliance/dpa | Fabian Sommer

Yet, while German ownership is still small, the community is visible enough to make others curious. That goes for even the traditionally risk-averse savings banks, or Sparkassen – where many Germans park their savings. The Savings Bank Association says around 10 percent of its regular customers already hold cryptocurrency, leading them to start offering customers the chance to invest in a crypto wallet directly from their checking accounts.

Many of the online brokerages popular with Germany-based investors, such as Trade Republic, Scalable, and DKB, also offer cryptocurrency wallets alongside their options to buy more traditional products like stocks and ETFs. Using their smartphone apps, crypto can typically be bought and sold with a few short clicks.

READ ALSO: How to protect your savings against inflation in Germany

The Modern Investor says that’s part of a culture that’s increasingly viewing crypto as just another normal part of the investing landscape. While crypto suspicion is still high globally, Germany has simply chosen to accept that crypto is here to stay, and has decided to benefit from it. 

“Germany has been one of the very few countries that have actually put forth cryptocurrency regulations. So a lot of internationally mobile investors have run to Germany as a bit of safe option,” the Youtuber says.

“Many countries don’t have any regulations at all. That makes things even less predictable. What happens to a crypto investor in the US or China if either of those countries simply ban it tomorrow? With Germany, people know that’s simply not going to happen now.”

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