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COVID-19 VACCINES

KEY POINTS: How will Italy enforce its vaccine mandate for over-50s?

Italy has made it compulsory for all over-50s to get vaccinated. Here’s what we know about how it will enforce the requirement.

Vaccines are now mandatory for over-50s in Italy.
Vaccines are now mandatory for over-50s in Italy. Tiziana FABI / AFP

Who’s subject to the mandate?

Everyone currently aged 50 and over in Italy, as well as anyone due to turn 50 by June 15, 2022, is now required to get a Covid vaccine.

The text of the decree, which was published in Italy’s Official Gazette on January 7th, is explicit that the rules apply to all those resident in Italy – not just Italian citizens.

The sanction applies not just with regard to first doses, but also for anyone who as of February 1st has failed to complete their primary vaccination cycle ‘in accordance with the instructions and within the time provided by circular of the Ministry of Health’ or get their booster dose within the time frame stipulated in a decree issued on April 21, 2021 and updated on June 17, 2021, the decree says.

According to the news daily il Quotidiano, that means that anyone in the age bracket who has gone more than six months since receiving their last shot would be in violation of the mandate – even if they have completed the primary vaccination cycle.

Why is Italy targeting the over-50s?

The latest records from the national statistics agency Istat show that 28 million people in Italy out of a total of 59 million residents – almost half the population – are over the age of 50.

Whilst Italy has one of highest Covid vaccination rates in Europe (74 percent are fully jabbed) it’s estimated that around 2.3 million people aged over 50 in the country have still not had a single dose.

There have also been plenty of reports in Italian media of how unvaccinated Covid patients are ending up in hospital intensive care wards.

In recent days the country has seen record highs in its Covid infection rates, with over 196,000 new cases recorded on Wednesday. Pressure on hospitals is mounting, and the majority of those hospitalised due to Covid are unvaccinated and over 50. 

READ ALSO: Italy to make Covid-19 vaccination mandatory for over 50s

By introducing the mandate, the government hopes to avoid overwhelming healthcare facilities and keep the country open as people return from their Christmas holidays and schools start up again.

“We are working in particular on the age groups that are most at risk of being hospitalised, to reduce pressure on hospital to save lives,” said prime minister Mario Draghi at the cabinet meeting where the measure was adopted.

READ ALSO : Italian hospitals inundated with Covid patients

When does the rule take effect?

Those who fall into the age bracket are required to get vaccinated from the day after the decree’s publication in the Official Gazette. As the decree was published on January 7th, the mandate came into force on January 8th.

To allow people time to book an appointment, sanctions won’t apply until February 1st.

From February 15th, workers aged 50 and over will need to produce a ‘super green pass’, which shows the bearer is vaccinated against or recently recovered from Covid, to enter their workplace.

A health worker administers a dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine
An individual receives the Johnson & Johnson vaccine on August 5, 2021 at the Ambreck pharmacy in Milan. (Photo by MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP)

Are there any exemptions?

Cases where the Covid vaccine would pose an “established danger to health, in relation to specific documented clinical conditions, certified by a doctor” are exempted from the requirement to get vaccinated.

In addition, any over-50s who can prove they have recovered from Covid in the past six months will be able to go to work using their ‘super green pass’ without having had the vaccine. Once that six month period is up, however, employees will require a vaccine to have their green pass extended so they can continue going to work.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: What’s in Italy’s latest Covid decree?

What are the penalties for refusing to get vaccinated?

Employees over 50 caught in their workplace without the super green pass are subject to fines of between 600 and 1500 euros.

Those barred from entering the workplace because they don’t have a pass can’t be fired, but will be marked as absent without leave and will have their pay frozen until they can produce the pass and resume their employment.

Aside from these worker-specific penalties, the decree states that anyone living in Italy over the age of 50 who is found to be unvaccinated by February 1st will be fined 100 euros.

How are the authorities going to check?

As far as workplaces are concerned, it’s the responsibility of employers to ensure their staff are complying with Covid restrictions. 

Employers that fail to do so face fines of between 400 and 1,000 euros. All workplaces are subject to periodic checks by police to determine whether the rules are being enforced.

As for 100 euro fines for unvaccinated residents over the age of 50, the decree states that the sanction “shall be carried out by the Ministry of Health through the Inland Revenue-Recovery Agency (…) by acquiring data made available by the Health Card System.”

Those who the Italian health system has registered as unvaccinated will be notified and have ten days to communicate to their local health authority the reason why they’re not vaccinated, the decree says.

Member comments

  1. its a nightmare to get a vaccine here in the south Capaccio , the first jab last year I stood in a queue for five hours , the second wasnt too bad , around two hours then last week monday 27th dec I waited in a long queue for hours to be told they had run out of vaccine and to come back on monday jan 3rd Which I did , they opened at 15.00 I arrived at 13.00 and there was already a queue , although I was no 6 and they opened at 15.00 I didnt actually get jabbed until 16.27 . there were many people behind me and I doubt they all got a jab , probably waiting many hours I am 72 years old and view myself as fit and healthy , there were many others who should not have been put through that torture of waiting for hours in the cold , they obviously had ailments , the next jab day is friday 7th open at 15.00 hours , the staff seem to be working really hard , its the organisation . I feel that given how the virus is rising so quickly the vaccine centres should be open more through the week and with more vaccine to go round .

  2. We have sovereign rights as human beings. They cannot lawfully enforce this. The data you have quoted is just fear-mongering. How exactly can they distinguish between the alleged different strains of the virus, what test do they use now that the PCR has finally been recognised by the CDC as being unable to tell the difference between the seasonal flu and Covid 19. How many people have died from the Omicron variant and what is the ration of vaxxed to unvaxxed for these deaths? Filter in how many of the unvaxxed deaths are actually vaxxed people who have been vaxxed for under 2 weeks, or 3 weeks, etc. Data is being manipulated to manipulate people.
    Instead of simply pushing government propaganda do some real, useful and informative research and give your readers an more critical and balanced viewpoint.

  3. Did that comment originate from the Local or from someone too spineless/ashamed to be named? What a disgusting fascist comment. You are obviously too stupid or brainwashed to see that this has nothing to do with health. None of these measures have any effect on slowing the virus – just look at ‘the elephant in the room’ that is Sweden. You are being lied to by your government – it is tragic to see this happen to such a beautiful country

    1. Hi We can assure you this comment was not made by a journalist at The Local but by a reader. We have contacted them to change their alias and warned them about their comment. Kind regards. Ben

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COVID-19 RULES

Masks to remain mandatory on Italian flights after May 16th

It will still be obligatory for passengers to wear masks on flights to Italy until mid-June, despite the end of the EU-wide requirement on Monday, May 16th, the Italian government has confirmed.

Masks to remain mandatory on Italian flights after May 16th

The Italian government reiterated on Friday that its current mask-wearing rules remain in place until June 15th, reports newspaper Corriere della Sera.

This means the mask mandate will still apply to all air passengers travelling to or from Italy, despite the end of an EU-wide requirement to wear masks on flights and at airports across the bloc from Monday.

READ ALSO: Reader question: What type of mask will I need for travel to Italy?

National regulations take precedence, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) confirmed when announcing the end of the EU rules.

“Wearing face masks at airports and inflight should be aligned with national measures on wearing masks in public transport and transport hubs,” they said in a joint statement published on May 11th.

READ ALSO: Why are so many Italians still wearing face masks in shops?

“If either the departure or destination States require the wearing of face masks on public transport, aircraft operators should require passengers and crew to comply with those requirements inflight, beyond 16 May 2022.

“Further, as of 16 May 2022, aircraft operators, during their pre-flight communications as well as during the flight, should continue to encourage their passengers and crew members to wear face masks during the flight as well as in the airport, even when wearing a face mask is not required”.

The Spanish government also said on Thursday that air passengers would have to continue wearing face masks on planes.

Italy’s current rules specify that higher-grade FFP2 masks should be worn on all forms of public transport, including buses, trams, regional and high-speed trains, ferries, and planes.

Though rules were eased in some settings from May 1st, masks also remain a requirement until June 15th at Italy’s cinemas and theatres, hospitals and care homes, indoor sporting event and concert venues, schools and universities.

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