SHARE
COPY LINK

POLITICS

What you need to know about the Swedish government’s proposals to cut tax for 7.5 million people

Sweden's Finance Minister has announced three tax cuts ahead of the autumn budget, which she expects will have an impact on the wallets of three quarters of the total Swedish population.

What you need to know about the Swedish government's proposals to cut tax for 7.5 million people
The changes proposed would affect low- and middle-income earners, members of unemployment insurance funds, and people on sickness benefits. Photo: Johan Jeppsson/TT

“This means more money in the wallet for ordinary people,” Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson, one of the favourites to take over as leader of the governing Social Democrats, promised when she announced the cuts.

One of the cuts would be a further extension of a tax cut aimed at low- and middle-income earners. This will be up to a maximum of 2,820 kronor per year in 2022 for those earning over 265,000, with smaller reductions for those on lower salaries.

Another proposal is to increase the tax reduction for sickness and disability benefits, reducing the gap between taxes on those benefits and earned incomes. Currently, people who receive these benefits pay around 10,000 kronor more in tax on average when compared to a working person on the same income level, and Andersson said the change would lead to “increased fairness in society” by supporting a “financially vulnerable group”. 

The third proposal is a tax reduction for payments to unemployment insurance funds (a-kassor), equal to 25 percent of the annual fee or a tax reduction of roughly 400 kronor per year for most members of these funds. The goal of this change is to encourage more workers in Sweden to join the funds, which pay members who become unemployed. 

So how much more would you get in your wallet if the proposals go through?

Andersson presented examples showing that a retired person on a pension of 240,000 kronor for example, would benefit to the tune of 1,668 kronor each year, and that a family made up of an assistant nurse and shop assistant (with annual salaries of 371,920 and 362,880 kronor respectively) would have 3,432 kronor extra after the changes.

“I think it’s not enough to be considered as a promise aimed at winning votes [in the September 2022 election], it doesn’t have enough impact on the wallet. But we’ll see what the rest of the budget will consist of. After all, this is a small part of the total budget,” Emma Persson, a private economist at Länsförsäkringar, told the TT newswire.

“The winners in this are those who are part of an unemployment insurance fund, live on sickness benefits and low- and middle-income earners who get to see a small boost to their wallet. Even if it is not a huge tax cut, for a person who earns 25,000 kronor, it is about 110 kronor a month,” she added.

In order for the cuts to actually come into effect, the government will need to get its budget passed by parliament in a vote. 

That’s not necessarily guaranteed, given that the margins between the different blocs are extremely thin and a previous alliance with the Centre and Liberal parties collapsed earlier this year. 

Passing its budget would require the government to get support from both the Centre and Left parties, who were both positive about Wednesday’s announcement.

However, the Centre’s economic political spokesperson told the TT newswire the reduction was “completely insufficient” to convince the party to vote in favour.

The Left Party said it would need to hear more about plans for financing the proposals, with their spokesperson welcoming the change to sickness benefits, but noting: “If you lower taxes, there will be less money for grandma’s elderly care and for healthcare that needs more resources. In the long run, it is unsustainable, so we expect this to be financed by raising taxes for those who have large capital incomes, large fortunes or large incomes in general.”

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

TERRORISM

Sweden to make it illegal to be active in a terrorist organisation

Sweden's government has submitted a new terror bill which could help convince Turkey that the country is acting to crack down on Swedish residents active in the Kurdish PKK terror group.

Sweden to make it illegal to be active in a terrorist organisation

The new proposal, titled “a special penalty provision for participation in a terrorist organisation”, will make participation in the activities of a terrorist organisation in any way that “promotes, strengthens or supports” the organisation punishable with up to four years in prison. 

“This is a wider criminalisation that takes aim at a slew of activities within a terrorist organisation that don’t need to be concretely connected to a specific terrorist crime,” Justice Minister Gunnar Strömmer told a press conference.

“Sweden has an increased terrorist threat which must be taken very seriously,” he continued. “Now the government is putting forward a legislative proposal which means that both participation in and financing of participation in terrorist organisations will be punishable.” 

Actions such as handling equipment, organising camps or locations for meetings, cooking or being in charge of transport for designated terrorist organisations would be criminalised under the new law, which Strömmer stressed was a “considerable widening of the scope compared to current legislation”.

In November, the country amended its constitution to allow the proposed bill to move forward, as it was deemed to infringe on Sweden’s freedom of association laws.

The proposal will now go to Sweden’s Council on Legislation, which judged a previous proposal to ban membership of a terror organisation, brought in in the wake the 2017 Stockholm terror attack, as in conflict with Sweden’s constitution right to free association. 

Under the proposal, serious cases of the new crime will be punishable by up to eight years in prison, while those found guilty of holding a leadership position in a terror organisation could be jailed for 18 years or even for life. 

The proposal criminalises all forms of support for terror organisations, regardless of whether it is financial or other ways of taking part in it, promoting it and strengthening it. 

Strömmer noted that “partaking in a demonstration or at a meeting will not in itself be punishable”, adding that said flag-waving in itself would not be criminalised but such activities could potentially be used as evidence in court.

The government hopes to be able to submit the proposal to parliament on March 7th, and for it to come into force by June 1st. 

SHOW COMMENTS