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This map shows where to find the best desserts in Italy

The Gambero Rosso - the equivalent of the Michelin guide or the Bible for Italian foodies - has released its annual list of the very best pastry shops up and down the country.

This map shows where to find the best desserts in Italy
Photo: Giuseppe Cacace/AFP

The culinary experts say that the country's dessert sector is thriving. Italy's pastry chefs “are renowned as masters, for their creativity, technique and ingredients,” it notes.

A total of 18 bakeries received over 90 points from Gambero Rosso's cake connoisseurs – up from 15 last year, with four new entries in the top list and only one bakery losing the honour. The bakeries with scores over 90 earned the 'Tre Torte' title ('three cakes', the guide's version of three Michelin stars).

Top of the pack was Pasticceria Veneto in Brescia, with 95 points. The 'best pasticceria in Italy' is run by renowned pastry chef Iginio Massari, who has published several books on cake-making and is one of the judges on Italian MasterChef, as well as training the Italian team for the annual 'Pastry World Cup'. 

But if you can't make it to Brescia, it's likely that there's another top bakery near you – the 18 with 'tre torte' ranking are spread fairly evenly across the country. 

The map below shows exactly where they are – you could even organize a pastry-themed road trip to judge them for yourself. 

As well as the traditional ranking, Gambero Rosso handed out some special awards: the Corsino bakery in Syracuse won the 'Taste and Health' award for its totally gluten-free selection, and the Newcomer of the Year award went to the La Pâtisserie des Rêves, a traditional French bakery which recently opened up in Milan, just a few steps from the city's famous cathedral. 

Here's the list (in order of ranking) of all the bakeries awarded the prestigious 'Tre Torte' award.

1. Pasticceria Veneto, Brescia
2. Dalmasso, Avigliana
3. Maison Manilia, Montesano sulla Marcellana
4. Besuschio, Abbiategrasso
5. Gino Fabbri Pasticcere, Bologna
6. Acherer, Brunico
7. Biasetto, Padua
8. Nuovo Mondo, Prato
9. Pasquale Marigliano, Ottaviano
10. Bompiani, Rome
11. Caffè Sicilia, Noto, Syracuse
12. Cortinovis, Ranica
13. Cristalli di Zucchero, Rome
14. Dolce Reale, Montichiari
15. Ernst K Knam, Milan
16. Pasticceria Agricola Cilentana Pietro Macellaro, Piaggine, Sardinia
17. Rinaldini, Rimini
18. Sal De Riso Costa d'Amalfi, Minori (SA)

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La Bella Vita: The best Italian-language podcasts, and unexpected foods you'll find in Italy

La Bella Vita is our regular look at the real culture of Italy – from language to cuisine, manners to art. This new newsletter will be published weekly and you can receive it directly to your inbox, by going to newsletter preferences in ‘My Account’ or follow the instructions in the newsletter box below.

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Is there an aspect of the Italian way of life you’d like to see us write more about on The Local? Please email me at [email protected]

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